The Apertura Wishlist – Cameras I wish existed (Part 1)

Canon M

There have been many cameras throughout the modern era, from mainstream hits, to obscure, fascinating oddities. Something I love is obscure and fascinating things, so naturally they pique my interest. One of my favourites – and one I’d love to own – is the Canon EF-M. Before this became the acronym for their mirrorless lens mount, it was used on an export-only, manual version of the EOS 1000 35mm SLR. Without an LCD screen or typical mode selector dial, this was a manually operated, manually focused SLR from a company who had made a concerted effort to embrace auto focus with their EOS line. The wiki article here will fill in more detail for you if you’re unfamiliar with this particular Canon.

Since discovering the EF-M, I’ve often wished Canon would engineer a modern, digital equivalent. Leica can create monochrome, display-free bodies almost at will and given their following, surely Canon could stand to do the same thing too. If nothing else, it would be an alternative for purely stills shooters who don’t necessarily need the 4K, mic-input trappings of a 5D Mark IV; however, they would very much benefit from DIGIC 7 and some of the better lenses out there, all of which have a manual setting.

By removing some of the features, it could also lower the price. This I feel is an important consideration. I’d always buy just enough camera you need, so I could spend more on lenses. With a £1000 full frame, manual DSLR, you could spend the extra £1000+ an EOS 5D model would cost on more lenses, of which Canon has the most varied line-up of all. A niche product that would still drive their lens business? Sounds fairly low risk, but potentially headline grabbing work, eh Canon?

Whilst I appreciate it is not a camera for every photographer out there, that’s fine – they are already very well catered for. Sure, you could just shoot everything manually on your DSLR, which I often do, but the change in handling, to include some of that Fuji tactility could make it a really sweet product. As can be seen in my mock-up (pardon the Photoshop, it’s been some years since I last dabbled) there are two selector dials. On the right you have ISO, with a Drive and WB button familiar to the EOS range. On the left, your shutter speed dial with a range from 1/4000 to 30 seconds and Bulb mode.  The  right-hand jog wheel that normally functions to alter shutter speed is now the Exposure Compensation. Otherwise, no bells or whistles. My perfect Canon digital camera.

 

Thanks for reading, cheers. Matt.

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